SEO Audience Research and Analysis: 7 Techniques

When asked to define SEO, SEO Malaysia often say it combines elements of advertising, computer science, and psychology.

When marketing anything, it’s important to know not just what issues your product addresses but also how to effectively convey that message to your target market. Technically speaking, you’ll need to be able to provide a groundwork for your website that boosts its visibility in search results.

Now, here’s where an SEO truly shines: from a psychological point of view.

Your search engine optimization efforts will bear fruit if you take the time to not just locate, but also characterize your perfect website visitor down to their unique interests and behaviors. You’ll be able to prove the efficacy of your campaign with hard data like visitor totals and return on investment rates.

Rankings aren’t everything in SEO (i.e., keyword ranking positions, number of backlinks, traffic, etc.). It’s also important to do research on your target demographic before launching an SEO strategy. If your SEO efforts are focused on the proper people, you’ll see an uptick in qualified visitors and a subsequent rise in sales.

For SEO purposes, there are a number of tools available to aid with audience research and analysis.

As you’ll see in the following list, each approach incorporates a number of helpful tools that may be used at any point.

1. Keywords are a great way to collect demographic information.

Search engine optimization (SEO) relies heavily on keyword research. You undoubtedly already know that keywords should be specific and relevant to your business’s offerings.

After compiling a comprehensive list of keywords, you should choose the top five that best reflect your business and research the demographics connected to those words and phrases.

With Google Trends, you can see how a search has evolved in popularity over time and also see demographic data related to a certain place.

During the epidemic, when people’s internet activities were rapidly evolving, Google Trends came in very helpful.

Since one of my clients produces cookbooks, the topic of what kinds of foods people look for while they’re snowed up at home naturally came up.

This baked good tasted like bananas.

Because we were stuck indoors, it seems that familiar dishes were a priority. The screenshot below demonstrates the meteoric rise in popularity of “banana bread.”

However, how about the statistics from the people who make up the population?

Even though Google Trends is a fantastic resource for this kind of information, I find that Demographics.io gives even more in-depth analysis of the area’s demographics. It connects demographic information with search terms.

Below, we’ve compiled statistics on how often users searched for the term “banana bread” on Google.

2. Learn more about your website’s visitors

This strategy is similar to highlighting the target area surrounding the arrow.

However, you must first know who is visiting your website in order to know whether they are the right people to target.

Google Analytics is a simple tool that may help you get this data.

The Audience tab provides access to demographic data such as age, gender, geography, and interest.

How to Use This Data as a Guide

Using this information, you may better advise the audience on content subjects and suggested regions to focus on.

However, you may examine this data and find that it does not correspond with the demographics of the customers you want to attract to your business.

In such situation, you should inspect your keywords and content carefully to check for any discrepancies.

3. Think About Competing Brands
Beyond your own website, research other companies and rivals to learn more about your target demographic.

The goal is to gather as much information as possible, therefore demographics and psychographics are on your list of things to search for. The following resources are useful for this kind of investigation.

Quantcast

Quantcast collects data from a wide variety of sources, including consumer preferences, professions, device use, demographics, domain affinity, and more. Goodreads.com is the subject of the analysis that follows.

Audience

Observation from the Audience: I really like using this programme.

Audiense.com claims that their audience is constructed using “eight different criteria,” any two of which “can be combined together allowing the creation of highly targeted audiences:” demographics, relationships, behaviour (activity), conversations, IBM Watson personality insights, geography, interests, and a user’s Twitter profile.

The next step in Audiense’s audience segmentation process involves “clustering people based on ‘who knows who,'” i.e., how these persons are related. We group people based on who they follow, so if A follows B, they’ll both be put in the same cluster.

A summary of the audience statistics is shown on the report’s first screen, as seen below.

Audiense.com claims that their audience is constructed using “eight different criteria,” any two of which “can be combined together allowing the creation of highly targeted audiences:” demographics, relationships, behaviour (activity), conversations, IBM Watson personality insights, geography, interests, and a user’s Twitter profile.

The next step in Audience’s audience segmentation process involves “clustering people based on ‘who knows who,'” i.e., how these persons are related. We group people based on who they follow, so if A follows B, they’ll both be put in the same cluster.

A summary of the audience statistics is shown on the report’s first screen, as seen below.

This tool’s amazing feature is that it allows for further subdivision. In order to have a better understanding, just look at the breakdown of data (see the red box on the screenshot).

How to Use This Data as a Guide

This information, like that gleaned from the previous technique, may provide light on the target demographic and guide suggestions for content and geographic focus.

Also, depending on your specific areas of interest, you can come across some fantastic resources for link development.

4. Use social insight

One of the easiest methods to learn about a target market is via social media.

Use Followerwonk to research the customer bases of your competition and similar businesses. This app’s useful word cloud displays the most frequently used phrases, so you can see what others are talking about.

How to Use This Data as a Guide
In particular, Followerwonk’s word cloud might reveal other keywords you may have overlooked and provide content marketing inspiration.

5. Do a Survey

The other options on this list are more complicated, but this one is the simplest. Send out a survey to your target demographic to get insight into their thoughts and opinions.

If you want a respectable response rate from your survey, make it brief. Inquire about the person’s age, gender, ethnicity, marital status, occupation, and general interests and pain spots.

If you’re looking for a helpful guide to designing and implementing a survey for content marketing purposes, look no further than How to Design and Implement Surveys for Content Marketing.

How to Use This Data as a Guide

Incorporate the survey results into a larger strategy to create content (blog posts, social media updates, videos, etc.).

6. Asking the Right Questions

Now more than ever, it’s crucial to know what queries users often have since Google is displaying solutions right on search engine results pages (SERPs).

How to Use This Data as a Guide

Make content that directly answers frequently asked questions to rank higher in Google’s search engine results pages (SERPs) and get more visitors from long-tail queries.

7. Look into Secondary Information

Once you have a sense of the demographics of your target audience (age, hobbies, etc.), you may fill in the spaces with targeted research. Seek for research that addresses one of the most important features of your target audience.
If you believe that your target demographic comprises Baby Boomers, you may use Google Scholar to find studies that have already been conducted on this age bracket.

How to Use This Data as a Guide

Make use of this new information to flesh out your character sketches and get a clearer understanding of your SEO audience.

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